Showing posts with label ultimate fighting championship. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ultimate fighting championship. Show all posts

February 15, 2015

PED's and Weight Cutting Issues = The Unprofessional Fighting Championship

Rousey in the new SI swimsuit edition
The UFC fan seems to be a magnet for every feasible type of shit sandwhich that could be tossed at it!  Anderson Silva tested positive on a second post fight test, coupled with three more fighters not making weight this past weekend with UFC on Fox Sports One, is leaving the "leader" in mixed martial arts with black eye after black eye.  Now current champ Ronda Rousey and former UFC fighter Brendan Schaub are both chiming in with honestly sharp tongues. 

From Yahoo Sports:

"This is a combat sport, and we're not trying to hit a ball harder," Rousey said. "These drugs can make you hit a person harder. The only reason we're able to do this sport is that the level of human potential is just [low] enough that we can barely allow it. We're right at the threshold.
"It's not like we're getting to the point where it's, 'Oh, we're going to start to have higher world records for weight lifting.' No. We're going to be able to hurt each other more. That's what I'm worried about. I'm worried that this is going to keep escalating and escalating and escalating until somebody dies."

   In reference to those who criticize Rousey for not moving up a weight class to fight Cris Cyborg (who has tested positive for PED's:
 "I've been ready to fight her at any point. She's the one who left the UFC. She's the one who hasn't come to fight me. Because she's a cheater and a fraud, the last thing I'm going to do is make exceptions for her. I'm not going to move up and make things easier for her, because she's been making things easier for herself her whole life. She needs to learn a lesson that you can't do that [expletive] any more. And I'm here to teach everybody else that that is not acceptable. Cheating and bringing a weapon and trying to hurt someone with that weapon is not a way to get a consideration made for you."

   BJJEE.com offered this transcription from an interview with ex-UFC fighter Brendan Schaub:
“Listen, I would love to hear an argument for why I shouldn’t do steroids,” Schaub said. “Give me one. Let’s say I take steroids and test positive. Say I’m a young kid [getting to the UFC] and I ask my dad, ‘Dad, why shouldn’t I take steroids?’ Can I say, ‘Well, you’ll never be world champ.’ That’s not true. Anderson Silva’s world champ. ‘Well, you’ll never fight for a title.’ That’s not true.
   “Chael Sonnen tested positive, fought for a title. ‘Well, you’ll never be ‘The Ultimate Fighter’ coach.’ Nope, Chael Sonnen, Anderson Silva. ‘Well, you’ll never be a main event.’ No, not true. Alistair Overeem’s a main event. Bigfoot Silva’s a main event. ‘Well, listen, you might get fired.’ No, not really. Guys pop all the time. If it’s cheating, everyone else is doing it and they’re getting rewarded for it.”
   “You know what’s infuriating to me? It’s not that I’m not champ,” said Schaub. “It’s not that I’ve lost some fights or won some big fights. It’s more that there’s just no reason everyone shouldn’t take steroids. There’s just not. In the UFC there’s no reason. Someone give me a legit reason why you would tell a young fighter not to take them. I would love to hear a good argument. ‘Well, you’ll get fined $3000 and you’ll have to sit out six months, maybe nine.’ I fight every six months anyway.”
   “I fought a guy named Lavar Johnson. At the weigh-in when he weighed in I went to [UFC president] Dana White like, ‘That guy’s on roids.” They laughed. Everyone’s like, ‘Come on.’ Are you kidding me? The guy is jacked. He could go win Mr. Olympia. My team’s laughing. I’m not laughing. I’ve got to fight him.”
   “So then I fight this guy. I don’t stand with him. I take him down over and over. I just kept taking him down because I knew he was jacked on steroids. I’m not going to play that game. I took a lot of heat for that. Everyone from the company, outside the company, fans, everyone. ‘Why didn’t you stand and bang with him?’ Well, I’m all natural and this guy’s jacked out of his mind on steroids. It doesn’t make sense for me. Make it a level playing field and I’m the Leonard Garcia of the heavyweight division.”
   “Anderson Silva landed some shots on Nick Diaz. Those shots, I promise you, are going to catch up with Nick down the road. Now, we don’t know how severe those shots were but I guarantee it’s more severe when a guy’s on steroids.”

Some solid truth in those words whether you like them or not.  I don't pretend to have all the answers but it is high time we stop pretending and either completely accept that the majority of athletes in ALL sports are juicing to some degree or another, or we completely ban the substances and the culture that surrounds them unequivocally. 

January 31, 2015

UFC: The Unprofessional Fight Club

"Chips" Gastelum needs more salads!

On the eve of one of the most anticipated events ever in UFC PPV history (Diaz vs Silva... return of Anderson Silva from a nasty leg break), two of their fighters do not make weight in what has become a common issue with the organizations fighters. 

Kelvin Gastelum and John Lineker could not make weight, with Gastelum 9, yes you read that correctly, nine pounds over the 171 weight class he was fighting at!  For those of you unaware as to how weight classes work, nine pounds is damned near another weight class.  (To read the entire article click here)

I am not sure how to refer to these immature children.  They certainly cannot be referred to as professionals as a professional follows through with whatever he agreed to do work wise (in this case a contract with weight classes).  Neither is the reference of martial artist appropriate because a TRUE martial artist would NEVER be so disrespectful to his opponent.  I mean lets be frank here... nine pounds over indicates that you did not even try to make weight.  Completely insulting. 

Lineker needs to spend less time cuddling and more time on cardio
Dana White specifically and the entire MMA culture in general has some important issues to address here in the near future because taking money from hard working folks for this level of amateur horseplay is nothing more than horseshit! 


November 9, 2014

Are Jiu Jitsu Competitions to Blame For Wrestlings Dominance in MMA?

Best in the biz... Burroughs with his double

Pedro Olavarria over at Fightland just published an excellent article on one possible reason that so many high level Brazilian Jiu Jitsu players have had such a difficult time transferring those skills into their MMA careers.  Is collegiate wrestling to blame for such inadequacies?  Or does the modern day rule set as dictated by IBJJF poorly prepare competitors for MMA/self defense?  Food for thought here...


Self Defense Applicability??
"The other reason for sport jiu jitsu’s relative non-transferability to MMA is the same reason for wrestling’s success. In MMA, slightly more than half of all takedowns are done with the double leg or single leg takedown; compare that to the NCAA Division 1 Wrestling Finals, where from 2012-2014, 50% of successful takedowns were single leg and double leg takedowns. The most successful takedowns in wrestling are the most successful takedowns in MMA. In sport jiu jitsu, if we look at the 2012 Pan Ams, more than 75% of the matches got to the ground because one or both players pulled guard. In the 2012 Worlds, roughly 75% of all matches got to the ground because one or both players pulled guard, with more than 50% of the matches going to the ground, in less than 10 seconds. Despite the fact that jiu jitsu requires a fight to be on the ground, sport jiu jitsu competitors are spending comparatively little time training in or fighting for takedowns. Sport jiu jitsu champions who cross over into MMA are hampered by the submissions they have overemphasized and the wrestling takedowns they have neglected in winning tournaments. What is the solution to this overdependence on joint locks and the neglect of effective takedowns?
    The solution to these problems is something for jiu jitsu masters and tournament promoters to figure out. Should they award more points for takedowns? Should they ban guard pulling while both players are on their feet? Should punches be allowed on the ground for higher belts? I don’t know. Certainly, the leaders of the jiu jitsu community need to answer for themselves whether MMA is even relevant to jiu jitsu anymore. The whole point of vale tudo and the original UFC was to prove that jiu jitsu works and that ground fighting is essential for anyone seriously interested in self-defense. Because of the Gracies, future generations of young men and women who want to learn actual fighting will be spared from the boredom and inefficacy of kata, one step-sparring and board breaking."

To read the entire article click here.

March 28, 2014

Head Trauma in Mixed Martial Arts - American Journal of Sports Medicine

Proponents of mixed martial arts (MMA) have long claimed it safe"er" then boxing and kickboxing due to the number of different ways one could win a match, not just percussive striking to the cranium.  That has always been the rub though, safer does not mean it is safe!  Obviously a number of factors and variables come into play with such a broad subject, but this is the first (to the best of my knowledge) academic study on head trauma in MMA. 

Just this week the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine released an article entitled "Head Trauma in Mixed Martial Arts" in their journal American Journal of Sports Medicine.  Using a descriptive epidemiology study, the doctors surveyed over 840 UFC matches between the years of 2006 and 2012 (this is notable as the UFC has been fully compliant with regulations and rules by this stage of their development ie. must wear 4oz gloves / banning of soccer kicks and stomps to the head etc.).  Thanks to my teacher Meynard for turning me onto this article.

The results are quite interesting, click here to read the entire abstract.  
Some serious food for thought for both professionals and hobbyists alike.  Lots of information coming to light regarding just how fragile our brain really is.  Below is the conclusion of the study:


Conclusion: Rates of KOs and TKOs in MMA are higher than previously reported rates in other combative and contact sports. Public health authorities and physicians should be cognizant of the rates and mechanisms of head trauma. Preventive measures to lessen the risks of head trauma for those who elect to participate in MMA are described.




February 24, 2014

Nate Quarry's Experience With the UFC

Fellow bloggers over at MMA Nuts shared this interesting read that heed's some sobering advice from former UFC fighter Nate Quarry.  Apparently Nate himself posted this on an online forum:


When I signed with the UFC this is what I was told”

We can’t pay you much but you can have any sponsors you want.

Then: We need to approve your sponsors.

Then: You can’t have any conflicting sponsors.

Then: You can’t thank your sponsors after fights.

Then: We are not approving any sponsors that we don’t like their product.

Then: Your sponsors have to pay us a fee of $50,000 for the pleasure to sponsor you.

Then: Your sponsors have to pay us a fee of $100,000 for the pleasure to sponsor you.

If a sponsor has a budget of 10k to sponsor a fighter, they are then out. If there are 5 shorts companies in the UFC you can only go to them for a sponsorship. If they have spent their budget or don’t want to support an up and coming fighter they give you shorts instead of money. If you’re fighting for $6,000 to show and fighting 3 times a year, even $500 makes a big difference. When there is no competition they don’t have to pay you. I lost And1 as a sponsor when the UFC enacted the tax.

At the UFC summit a fighter asked if he could wear his own shirt. Dana laughed and said, “Uh… we can talk about it.” I turned around and asked the UFC lawyer if I could wear my OWN shirt and he said, “Sure, give me $50,000 and we can talk about it.”






People have no clue from the outside what it’s like to fight for the UFC. After spending 10-15 years chasing your dream only to see that the company it’s been your dream to fight for cares nothing about the fighters and only cares about the bottom line.

When I was fighting for the UFC we got X-Mas presents like an iPod. A very bottom of the line iPod but it was still cool. Now the guys get a gift certificate to the UFC store and can use it ONE day. Any money they don’t spend on that day is forfeited.

A fighter gets to use the gym at the hotel he’s fighting at for free. The cornermen and everyone with him have to pay. So I’m helping Leben make weight the day of weigh ins and have to pay to go sit in the sauna with him. The UFC couldn’t say, “The fighter gets 3 people to go into the gym with him the week of the fight.”

That’s just nickel and dime stuff.

With every little bit they try to squeeze out of the fighters, the more the other organizations will look more attractive.

I’m incredibly grateful for the opportunity to fight for the UFC and everything I have besides my daughter has come from fighting. But let’s not fool ourselves. It’s not a charity. It’s a business. And they are doing everything they can to make money. The fighters are just a product to use and discard. Every up and coming fighter is the best ever. Every ex-fighter who then expresses an opinion is a coward, loser, etc, etc.

I fought for the world title for $10,000. Not a penny more. No bonus. No cut of the PPV. The gate alone was 3.5 million dollars. The third highest gate in UFC history at the time. And they must have loved the fight cuz they show the final punch at the start of EVERY UFC PPV. :-)

And that’s fine. Because it’s a business. But sooner or later the allure of fighting in the UFC will not be as attractive as fighting for an organization that takes care of you, appreciates you, will let you have sponsors to help make up the income gap, doesn’t trash you when you think for yourself, and on and on. Just like every business you work for. It’s funny to me to hear people cheer for Dana when he says things that if he was your boss and he said them about you, you would be looking for another job. But when you’re signed to a contract, you can’t go anywhere. No matter how much you want to.

When I retired I received a form letter, EMAILED to me that said, “Should you choose to fight again you are still under contract with the UFC.” I didn’t even get a hard copy with a real signature that I could frame.

As I said, I love what the UFC has done for me and my family. And specifically what Dana has done for me.
But I also know it’s a business. And that’s the best piece of advice I can give to wanna be fighters. Fight for the love of the game. But you better treat it like a business. Because the promoter handing you a contract sure will.

January 26, 2014

BJJ Scout Previews Rousey vs. McMann Pt I - Grappling Game

BJJ Scout returns after a hefty holiday with a stellar breakdown of the upcoming Ronda Rousey and Sara McMann bout February 22, 2014.  Scout lays out some interesting observations in this initial breakdown focusing on grappling. 

Check out the entire article with the video by clicking here.